2:27 pm - Mon, May 7, 2012

We’re like a broken down city. It’s not just the economy that is causing Cleveland the problem right now. It’s the attitude. It’s the struggle of just seeing your mom on drugs or seeing your father locked up in jail.

We need to make a change. We need to stand up and say, okay, I’m not going to just sit down and watch TV on my couch. I’m going to go out to Cleveland and go help out some people. That’s what I’m expecting people to hear in our music.

Diandre Byfield, high school junior with the Progressive Arts Alliance, on how artistic outlets have helped him in the right direction

'What's Going on Now': Engaging Young People Through Music, Media, Messages

11:24 am - Thu, May 3, 2012
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wnyc:

Jeremy Lin may not be speaking at the graduation of Stuyvesant High School’s Class of 2012, but he still had some words of wisdom to share with the students.

- Newsroom

10:31 am
1 note

What would you ask the co-founder of the largest philanthropic organization in the world?

The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation controls over $30 billion, which its staff uses to pursue the goal of giving every child an equal opportunity to thrive. In the U.S., the focus has been on finding ways to fix inequalities within the public school system.

Do you have a question for Melinda Gates about the projects they’ve funded, lessons learned, their priorities and where they plan to focus their funding in the future?

11:53 am - Tue, May 1, 2012
2 notes

In Texas, college students close education gap for others

nbclatino:

Texas Tech students Laura Perez and Gustavo Chavira ready for FAFSA night at Ralls High School in Ralls, Texas (Photo courtesy Matthew Byler)

Eddie Vargas can hardly believe that he’s winding down his sophomore year at Texas Tech University. A first-generation college student, Eddie recalls how difficult it was to persuade his parents to allow him to leave his hometown of Midland, Texas for a college two hours away.

Read More

2:33 pm - Thu, Apr 26, 2012
A year and a half into Waffle House, there was a woman who worked there for 26 years. And I’m like, wow, I have got to go back to school. I don’t want to be like that.
5:41 pm - Wed, Apr 25, 2012
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'How much education do you need?' More. Always more.

That’s because in America, more education=more choice. It’s as simple as that. The work you do. Where you live. This car or that car? This school district or that one? What do I do on a day off? All these choices are narrower the less education you have, and broader the more education you have. You may end up choosing the same things anyway…but that choice was made by you, not made for you.

12:22 pm - Tue, Apr 24, 2012
De’Qonton Davis, an eight grader at John Hopkins Middle School Center for the Arts, Journalism and Multimedia in St. Petersburg, Florida, made headlines recently with his Student Reporting Labs video on school violence. You can watch his report here, which features incredible footage of students fighting — sadly, a very common occurrence at his school (reports that his school has had over 100 arrests in a year). Our upcoming American Graduate piece documents how De’Qonton’s passion for photography helped him tell this story:
Photography and journalism have made me a different person. 
For the first time, I love telling stories because I can express myself through photos. It makes me want to come to school every day, and it has given me something that I’m really good at.
I like being able to tell stories without using words. I like being able to tell people things that are important in my life.
That’s how I came up with the idea of fights as the theme for our PBS NewsHour  project. They happen around me, in my neighborhood and at school. I thought it was important to tell this story because it shows people that when you do something in the neighborhood, it affects the school. It’s important for people to understand why this happens (frustration, anger and problems at home) because if we don’t understand it, we could never solve the situation or problem.
Taking photographs is like a meditating process for me; it lets me relax and no one is telling me to do this or do that.
I’m proud of my work. Seeing my photos in print, and finishing this PBS project, makes me feel like I can do anything. I have come a long way and I can’t stop now.
Seeing my finished projects make me feel like a millionaire. 
- De’Qonton
(Photo by Mike Fritz)

De’Qonton Davis, an eight grader at John Hopkins Middle School Center for the Arts, Journalism and Multimedia in St. Petersburg, Florida, made headlines recently with his Student Reporting Labs video on school violence. You can watch his report here, which features incredible footage of students fighting — sadly, a very common occurrence at his school (reports that his school has had over 100 arrests in a year). Our upcoming American Graduate piece documents how De’Qonton’s passion for photography helped him tell this story:

Photography and journalism have made me a different person. 

For the first time, I love telling stories because I can express myself through photos. It makes me want to come to school every day, and it has given me something that I’m really good at.

I like being able to tell stories without using words. I like being able to tell people things that are important in my life.

That’s how I came up with the idea of fights as the theme for our PBS NewsHour  project. They happen around me, in my neighborhood and at school. I thought it was important to tell this story because it shows people that when you do something in the neighborhood, it affects the school. It’s important for people to understand why this happens (frustration, anger and problems at home) because if we don’t understand it, we could never solve the situation or problem.

Taking photographs is like a meditating process for me; it lets me relax and no one is telling me to do this or do that.

I’m proud of my work. Seeing my photos in print, and finishing this PBS project, makes me feel like I can do anything. I have come a long way and I can’t stop now.

Seeing my finished projects make me feel like a millionaire.

- De’Qonton

(Photo by Mike Fritz)

4:58 pm - Mon, Apr 23, 2012
2 notes

At 40%, Native Americans have the highest dropout rate among any ethnic group

Dorene Wiese, American Indian Association:

"There were many instances where children were taken from their homes and forced into boarding schools, so you have [instances] where English was forced upon us as well. Our religions were forbidden. And even to sing and dance was against the law in the 1920s. You have this situation where, really, not only..was western education foreign to us, but it is oppressive. It is part of a genocide to really erase all of our tribes, all of our cultures."

(via Chicago Tonight)

1:52 pm
Kensington High School for the Creative and Performing Arts in Philadelphia, PA, where you can see the outdoors from any point within the green building.The project took a blighted, urban area high school and turned it into “a smaller high school that would encourage students to graduate rather than drop out with little hope for the future,” according to the AIA site.

Kensington High School for the Creative and Performing Arts in Philadelphia, PA, where you can see the outdoors from any point within the green building.

The project took a blighted, urban area high school and turned it into “a smaller high school that would encourage students to graduate rather than drop out with little hope for the future,” according to the AIA site.

1:32 pm
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